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Sandprints Of Death -- Nash Black

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Sandprints of Death - Out Now

Jim Young is banished by his family to a desolate winter beach to rebuild his smashed feet and legs. His left eye and racing career vanished as the prints in the sand are washed away by the tides.

Maud Tosh, a family friend, finds Jim on the beach as she is consigning the ashes of her abusive husband to the ocean. Together they discover the body of a young woman under the boardwalk stairs who was last seen in the hotel slapping a man no one can identify.

Matt Young’s football career was destroyed during a game that would have put the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl X. The brothers enjoyed an oyster harvest until Matt uncovers the garrotted corpse of an FBI agent.

Isaiah Young stops by for a visit before making his way to New York for his first major art exhibit. A maid is murdered while he plays the piano for all the hotel guests.

The wisest course for the Youngs is to leave the investigation of the deaths to the authorities, but Maud convinces Jim to seek answers to her questions.

Will those questions expose past and present secrets that are best left buried in the shifting sands?

Nash Black’s descriptions leap off the page to paint a stark picture of a barrier island’s winter landscape where a killer is bent on closing all escapes.

Related blog: http://seamewisland.blogspot.com

 

reviews

“The strength of the book is the beautifully drawn characters and their intricately portrayed clan stories that make you feel connected to them like family” Alina Holgate (Australia)

“Everybody here has secrets, and when those secrets start spilling and the murder count starts rising, the characters’ schemes and goals start crashing like the rising storm waves on the beach.” Tina W. (Resident of Georgia coast)

“Some beautiful turns of phrases and prose makes the book a delight to read from start to finish.” Tinkertoo (England)